Italian Indigenous Varieties: Mostosa Bianco

This week’s Italian indigenous variety is Mostosa Bianco erroneously confused in the past with Bombino Bianco but thought to be it’s own variety. I’m going slightly out of order because I’m not ready to write about the Moscato varieties today. This grape is often seen on the Adriatic coast, such as in Abruzzo, Emilia-Romagna, Lazio,and Le Marche. It’s quite a vigor variety and produces a large quantity of grapes. It is often blended with other grapes but not always. A white grape that makes wines that tend to be fresh and fruity and should be drunk when young. It isn’t usually used in wines that are put into one’s cellar to age.

Wines from in the Colli di Rimini DOP denomination in Romagna use it in their blend with Trebbiano di Romagna and Biancame. I haven’t been to Rimini in years but I have very fond memories of summers spent on the Adriatic coast in Romagna. The water was never beautiful but the people were lovely, I liked to ride a bike around the flat expanses under poplar trees and eat amazing fresh vegetables. It’s a great area to vacation with kids as well. The sea is very shallow and there are always lots of boardwalks and shops to explore as well as good restaurants. In it’s heyday, the area was known for its discos but not sure if that is still the scene. There are also lots of small towns to visit, one of my favorite is a mini Venice and is called Comacchio. I am actually considering spending some time there this summer. Stay tuned.

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