Monday Musings: Low Alcohol Wines

Today’s Monday Musings is about low alcohol wines. The picture above is of bubbles. I am thinking of bubbles that have low alcohol such as Moscato. Today is #NationalMoscatoDay. A lot has been written of late of this trend towards wines with lower levels of alcohol, I’m just wondering if this is on your mind as well. I also have noticed since the pandemic that many people are feeling a need to cut their consumption which got out of control. I know I drank much more frequently than I had before the pandemic. I wonder if the same is true of you.

I don’t often look at the alcohol level of the wines I buy but I do notice for example the weight of the bottle or the color in the glass or the amount of oak on a wine as signs that maybe the alcohol is high. Sometimes those items have nothing to do with alcohol but often they do.

When I first started drinking Italian wines, most were coming it at 12% ABV or 12.5% ABV. Then it crept up in the 2000s until 13% ABV and 14% ABV were the norm. I know some California wines come in at 15% or even 16% ABV but I wonder will that change post pandemic. I am curious to hear what other people think.

And mostly I am wondering, will Moscato have a second heyday among all drinkers, even wine snobs. It has been a drink of choice for some years among novice consumers, young folks, and the Kosher crowd – think Bartenura, the blue bottle you have likely seen numerous times.

I personally think Moscato is quite underrated, delicate and floral, it can work so well with different foods. Asti DOCG and Moscato d’Asti DOC are two historic denominations from Piedmont that merit attention.

I have been making wine at home for about 16 years. I don’t make it every year but the best wine I ever made was Moscato. I bought the grapes which came in from Lodi, California and the wine was ready to drink the spring after harvest. It was the first step in my looking at Moscato in a different way.

Maybe give it another try and pair it with something new, you might be surprised.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.